Category Archives: Pollinator Corridor

Wood’s Pink Asters

While Echinacea, Bee Balm. Queen Anne’s Lace, Lupine, lilies, and so many other flowers have passsed by, these late-blooming asters on the MRG Pollinator Corridor have become an important resource to a variety of pollinators. Bees, wasps, butterflies, moths, and flies are still looking for pollen and nectar and these asters are a welcomed bit of color, for humans too.

Yellow Collared Scape Moth
Common Bottle Fly
Drone Fly

Hardy Pollinator Flowers

In spite of the frost, there are still flowers in bloom mid-October: Sunflowers, Garlic Chives, Black-eyed Susans, and Asters, to name a few. Bees, wasps, and other pollinators continue to visit our MRG Pollinator Corridor, such as this bee on a Wood’s Pink Aster at Dysfuntion Junction. (Intersection of Mechanic, Mascoma, High streets.)

Pollinators!

Until this week, we have seen very few pollinators along the MRG Pollinator Corridor. It was a relief to finally spot many bees and a few monarchs and hummingbirds these last few days The red bee balm is a powerful draw! And the butterfly milkweed is finally attracting monarchs.

Where Are the bees?

There have been very few bees and butterflies along the MRG Pollinator Corridor so far this year. We keep hoping that they have found some idyllic, pesticide-free meadow nearby and are congregating there , soon to show up for the Echinacea, Black-eyed Susans, Bee Balm, Black Cohosh, Calendula, Day Lilies, Obedient Plant, and all the other treats on offer right now at the garden west of the overpass by APD. The good news is the hummingbird that was enjoying the red bee balm today!

Monarch Caterpillar!

Ordinarily, when bugs are eating our plants, it is cause for concern . . . but in a pollinator garden, when it’s a monarch caterpillar, we rejoice! Note how much of the leaf has been eaten!

MRG pollinator garden at intersection of Mascoma/Mechanic/High streets

Hummingbird Moth

IMG_6017 (1).jpg

Work on the tunnel this Spring destroyed the MRG pollinator garden on the Goss Logan hillside. Only the hardiest of perennials survived. Red bee balm was one of the survivors . . .  and it attracted this tiny hummingbird moth. These Dr. Seuss-like creatures have hummingbird energy, hovering and darting about. The proboscis and antennae are like those of butterflies. The furriness and striping are like bumble bees. The tail is like that of a lobster.

The caterpillar stage of the hummingbird moth looks much like a tomato hornworm. Hard to believe that this creature that looks so much like a hummingbird could emerge from such a caterpillar!

.The caterpillar of the hummingbird moth bears a horn at the tip of its tail that gives rise to the colloquial name of these larvae.  

Hummingbird Moth Caterpillar Stage

Rain!

Rain refreshed the various pollinator gardens along the MRG today – there were pollinators aplenty!

Silver Spotted Skipper on Echinacea

Tiny bees on Black-eyed Susan

Bee on Bee Balm

Silver Spotted Skipper on Liatris

Sweat bee on Echinacea

Climate Strike Action – Planting the Fruits of Tomorrow Today!

20190921_115236 (1).jpg

How lucky we were to have a beautiful day and so many Upper Valley Apple Corps folks and friends of Mascoma River Greenway responding to the call for volunteers.

The work was hard – gravel, rocks, boulders, hard-pack . . . all kinds of tools were needed

Different teams took on the varied parts of the project. Clearing brush, digging, struggling with boulders.

Imagine encountering this challenge and succeeding!

Rocky soil was sifted, apple trees and elderberry bushes set in place, in-filled, and topped off with cardboard mulch and compost.

Removing tape from reused boxes.


Water for plants.


Elderberries planted.


More compost! More water! More wood chips!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two organic Haralson apple trees and elderberry bushes were finally in place. Phase one accomplished!

A hearty crew set off the western end at the Price Chopper access.

Water, compost, and mulch trucked in – thanks Bart Guetti!

Eric, Barry, and Kathy planting a Red Osier DogwoodEric, Barry, and Kathy plant dogwood.


Kye, Bodhi, Barbara, and Eric planting the wetland rose bush.

Josie and Thomas planting aronia (black chokeberry)

Mulch brigade!

IMG_0429 (1) (1)

An organic Golden Russet apple tree and three organic high-bush blueberries planted near the umbrella sculpture, and high-bush cranberry, aronia, button bush, wetland rose, and red osier dogwoods planted in the moist area at the base of the Price Chopper access. Mission accomplished. Thank you Upper Valley Apple Corps and friends of Mascoma River Greenway And thanks to the Robert F. Church Charitable Trust for funding this MRG Pollinator Corridor project.

MRG Planting – Action for Climate Strike Week

15

 
Join Upper Valley Apple Corps and the MRG Pollinator Corridor Project for a day of planting fruit trees and berry bushes along the Mascoma River Greenway. We are “Planting for Solutions” as a part of the global strike week to raise awareness about climate emergency.  With funding from the Robert F. Church Charitable Trust, we will be planting organic fruit trees and berry bushes in support of pollinators, wildlife, and even hungry humans.

WHEN: Saturday, September 21st, 10:00-3:00 pm with a lunch break at 1:00 pm

WHERE: Park across from Alice Peck Day Homestead Building and walk west along the Mascoma River Greenway to the next parking lot ~ 500 yards.

WHY: To be a part of the solution, to have fun with community, and to learn to plant and care for fruit trees!

Bring gloves, water, and lunch. Tools and cider will be provided.

RSVP or Questions? Please contact: Karen@permaculturesolutions.org

Perfect Solution: WIlling Waterer and Bike with Saddlebags!

On these hot summer days, getting sufficient water to thirsty pollinator plants along the MRG can be a challenge, especially at Dysfunction Jct. where there is no easy parking. Bart Guetti, head of the Friends of Lebanon Recreation and Parks,  and willing waterer, has been watering the new plants by way of bike with saddlebags. Thank you Bart.  A perfect solution!

Image-1 - 2019-08-12T214914.202