Author Archives: uvlocalvores

New Tricycle!

It was a pleasure meeting this friendly couple on the Greenway today. She was riding her new trike, a gift from her husband a few days ago. They are recent transplants from Alaska and are enjoying easy access to the MRG. Jogging, biking, triking, skateboarding, rollerblading, dog-walking,  traveling on cross-country skis or snowshoes  .  .  .  many ways to enjoy the MRG!

Hummingbird Moth

IMG_6017 (1).jpg

Work on the tunnel this Spring destroyed the MRG pollinator garden on the Goss Logan hillside. Only the hardiest of perennials survived. Red bee balm was one of the survivors . . .  and it attracted this tiny hummingbird moth. These Dr. Seuss-like creatures have hummingbird energy, hovering and darting about. The proboscis and antennae are like those of butterflies. The furriness and striping are like bumble bees. The tail is like that of a lobster.

The caterpillar stage of the hummingbird moth looks much like a tomato hornworm. Hard to believe that this creature that looks so much like a hummingbird could emerge from such a caterpillar!

.The caterpillar of the hummingbird moth bears a horn at the tip of its tail that gives rise to the colloquial name of these larvae.  

Hummingbird Moth Caterpillar Stage

Rain!

Rain refreshed the various pollinator gardens along the MRG today – there were pollinators aplenty!

Silver Spotted Skipper on Echinacea

Tiny bees on Black-eyed Susan

Bee on Bee Balm

Silver Spotted Skipper on Liatris

Sweat bee on Echinacea

MRG Survey Deadline: Sunday, July 12, 2020

Thanks to all who have responded to the MRG Survey.  If we haven’t already heard from you, there is still time. The survey deadline is Sunday July 12, 2020.

https://mascomagreenway.com/mrgsurvey/

The survey is now closed – thanks to all who responded!

Rollerblade-Regular Chris

Working on the MRG pollinator gardens each day offers an opportunity to meet some of the MRG “regulars”. This is Chris who roller blades daily. She covers many miles as she skates back and forth, sometimes at least 10 miles. Since much of the MRG is in the shade of trees, it offers respite on these hot, muggy days. It’s a joy to see so many different people, in so many ways, enjoying this beautiful community resource.

We’d like to hear from you!


Image-1 - 2020-07-08T204805.241

We want to your hear about your experiences using the Mascoma River Greenway. Please take a few minutes to share your thoughts. The survey can be accessed here:

 https://mascomagreenway.com/MRGsurvey

Survey now closed – thanks to all who responded!

 

 

Precious Cargo!

 

It’s been fun to see so many children on the MRG of late.  They come by strollers, tricycles, scooters, bikes with training wheels  .  .  . and child chariots.  Such precious cargo!

Warning: Dagger Moth Caterpillars Sting!

A young woman rollerblading on the MRG this week had one of these caterpillars drop from a tree and down her shirt. The bristles caused a stinging sensation and turned into a burning rash. (As if Covid-19 and murder hornets aren’t enough!) Unfortunately, she tried to brush the burning away, which further embedded the bristles. She has since learned that applying tape to draw the bristles out is a better solution!)  With this caterpillar – look but don’t touch!

Trail Riders of the MRG!

  Spring has sprung, bringing us a new crop of trail riders!

 

Image-1 - 2020-05-22T121348.935

Garlic Mustard Squad!

Garlic Mustard, a real trouble-maker of a plant, is flowering in many areas of Lebanon. Be on the lookout for plants with 4 white petals

WHY  concern about this plant?

Native to Europe where it has many insect predators and diseases, it is only found there in small colonies.  Here, there are no insects that eat it and no disease to keep it in check.  It invades forests:  It disrupts forest ecosystems in several ways.  It has chemicals that are toxic to soil microbes and can greatly reduce propagation of native plants.  It can out-compete native plants and reduce biodiversity once it gets established.

It is a fierce competitor:  A single plant can produce hundreds of seeds.  It has no predators here.  It is a biennial and its seeds can be viable for 10 years. Once established, it is a long-term project to reduce it.  It is best to catch it early, before it turns into a long-term project.

WHAT can you do?

Learn to identify the plant (see link).  Help with pulling on your property and along road-sides in your neighborhood.

Pull the plant and put it in trash bags:  Be sure to pull from the base of the stalk and wiggle the plant so the entire white root comes up.  Be sure bags are tightly closed and properly disposed of.  Tell your neighbors and help organize socially distant community pulls (and tell us about them!) if you find larger colonies in your neighborhood.

 Help pull on the Mascoma River Greenway and Northern Rail Trail!
For the next two weeks, the City will have signs describing Garlic Mustard and bags for disposing of the plants (no trash please!) at a couple of locations on each of these popular public paths. Please stop and pull when you can, bag the pulled plants, and leave the bag, securely closed, for the next volunteer. Thanks to the Rec & Parks Department and DPW for coordinating disposal of full bags of Garlic Mustard. Please help by moving only securely tied & full bags to the trailhead of the rail trail (near CCBA) or to the MRG parking lot at Slayton Hill/Mascoma St so they can be picked up. Email me if bags need replacing.

Report locations where you find Garlic Mustard (better yet, where you pull it!): there are many reporting apps these days:

try iNaturalist or  EDDMaps.

With thanks to The Hanover Biodiversity Committee for permission to use their text and links.

Thanks and stay well,

Sarah Riley <rileysarah@yahoo.com>

Lebanon Conservation Commission

The plan:

Sunday, May 17th – Saturday, May 30th

Task: Pull the Garlic Mustard 2nd year growth

Drop off locations/Pick Up:

  • Slayton Underpass Parking Lot – Picked Up Monday/Friday – Recreation
  • Alice Peck Day Parking Lot – Picked up Monday/Friday – Recreation
  • Northern Rail Trail Head (by CCBA)  Picked up Thursday – Landfill